Archive for January, 2010

As Courts Overturn Campaign Finance Limits, Small Online Donations Will Matter More

This article originally appeared on September 20th of last year but is even more relevant following today’s announcement that the U.S. Supreme Court has opened the doors to direct political contributions by corporations and labor unions.

The announcement largely got lost in Friday clutter, but U.S. campaign finance restrictions took a serious hit at the end of last week. With the Roberts Supreme Court already apparently reconsidering past precedents with an eye toward treating corporate and union donations as free speech, a federal appeals court has now ruled on behalf of Emily’s List that nonprofits can use functionally unbounded “soft money” to finance their election-year activities.

(more…)

1 comment January 21st, 2010 Trackback Bookmark on del.icio.us

More Brown/Coakley Online Politics Post-Mortems

More articles have popped up on the internet’s role in the Brown/Coakley race, besides the Henri’s and mine posted here on Epolitics.com and the earlier link round-up:

Plus this compilation of reactions and explanations from Newsy.com:

cpd

1 comment January 21st, 2010 Trackback Bookmark on del.icio.us

In Defense of Martha Coakley’s New Media Team

Check out the following guest article for a view of the Brown/Coakley race different from what is rapidly becoming conventional wisdom in the online politics world. My friend (and Blue State Digital staffer) Henri Makembe was on the scene, and while he’s not happy with the outcome of the race, he’s here to defend Coakley’s new media team from accusations that they were asleep at the proverbial switch. For more from Henri, see his LocalPoliTechs site.

In Defense of Martha Coakley’s New Media Team

By Henri Makembe

Running on cheese pizza, RedBull, cold Dunkin Donuts coffee, cookies and the memory of the late Ted Kennedy, I spent the last few days volunteering for Martha Coakley alongside some of the best Democratic new media operatives. Some analysts are describing this as the most important election in the last 50 years — not including presidential contests. Despite our best efforts, Scott Brown won the seat that was held by someone who continues to be regarded as one of best, if not the best, senator of our time. Mr. Brown has some big shoes fill, and while I will be working hard against him in 2012, I wish him and his staff the best for the sake of the people of the commonwealth of Massachusetts.

What is being said…

Yesterday’s results have already produced a slew of articles and blogs posts about the use of new media during campaign from both traditional media outlets and blogs. CNN rightfully points out that Brown dominated Coakley online. WSJ highlights Brown’s effective use of Google Ads while ABC asks whether or not Brown is closing the digital gap between Republicans and Democrats. In the blogosphere, Tech President declares Google to be the winner of the election, ClickZ notes that the election could inspire a more digital GOP and AdAge goes for the obvious by pointing out that Coakley ignored the Obama Digital-Media playbook (of course, that is if you believe Obama had a playbook).

(more…)

5 comments January 20th, 2010 Trackback Bookmark on del.icio.us

In Utah to Help Train State Elected Officials

Hi folks, e.politics has temporarily relocated to Salt Lake City, camping out in a swankalicious hotel with a great view of the mountains (a nice change from sleeping on a park bench, believe you me). The goal, besides experiencing how The Other Half lives, is to help with an online politics training for Utah elected officials, along with David All and several other folks knowledgeable in the field.

One excellent bonus — we get to attend the Altitude Design Summit and hang out in the local design scene for a day or two, which should be both educational and fun all around. Trust me, I’ll take good notes during the training and at the conference and write up the juicy bits for all to enjoy. See y’all back in DC on Saturday — after which, I’ll have some very welcome additional news to pass along…

cpd

Add comment January 20th, 2010 Trackback Bookmark on del.icio.us

More on Scott Brown and Internet Politics

[Update: see Henri Makembe's defense of Coakley's new media team for a wrap-up of post-mortem articles on the race.]

More articles on the role of online organizing in Scott Brown’s potential Massachusetts victory:

Hell of a day for political junkies…

cpd

2 comments January 19th, 2010 Trackback Bookmark on del.icio.us

Scott Brown’s Massachusetts Insurgency Shows How Online Organizing Has Shifted the Political Calculus

Republican Scott Brown didn’t have much when he started running for Ted Kennedy’s Senate seat, but he did have himself and the internet:

The fundamental dynamic of the race fell in place months ago, when Brown set off in a pickup truck for the only campaign the Republican could afford: retail, door-to-door. The campaign was so strapped for cash that aides described the $40,000 spent in the primary as a major hit. Brown could not afford to mail out absentee ballots, often so crucial in a close race. “So our program consists of e-mail and Facebook and Twitter,” said Eric Fehrnstrom, a campaign official.

(more…)

4 comments January 18th, 2010 Trackback Bookmark on del.icio.us

Texting for Haiti: A Breakthrough for Cell-Phone Fundraising?

Have a cell phone and want to help Haiti? It’s easy — just Text HAITI to the short-code 90999 and $10 will go to Red Cross and be billed to your account. Within 30 hours of launching the campaign, the Red Cross had already raised over $3 million and set a record for donations via SMS. Is this the beginning of a revolution in electronic fundraising?

The advantages of raising money this way are obvious: people’s phones are usually close at hand, meaning that we can move immediately to convert sympathy into action. And unlike most other forms of electronic donations, texting to a short code doesn’t require a credit card or even a bank account (a bartender friend of mine has neither but was still able to send in his $10).

(more…)

3 comments January 17th, 2010 Trackback Bookmark on del.icio.us

E.politics “Daily Caller” Review Quoted on Salon.com

Be sure to check out Kate Harding’s recent Salon.com take on S.E. Cupp, a rising star in the right-wing punditosphere — and a non-blonde atheist, which makes her a bit of an outlier and a more interesting character than most of the cookie-cuttter talking heads that dominate Fox News. The most funnest part? Harding’s first paragraph relies on extensive quotes and paraphrases from Monday’s e.politics review of Tucker Carlson’s new “Daily Caller” site, including the excellent contributions by Josh Nelson (“a cross between ‘Politico, Drudge and the NY Post’”) and Roxanne Cooper (“Pajamas Media meets The Daily Beast”).

Kate links to the Huffington Post version of the article, which shows why it’s a good idea to publish articles like this one far and wide — you never know where someone’s going to find you. And while this means that Epolitics.com itself isn’t getting a direct traffic boost (or any Google Juice) out of the link, a quote in a top-level site like Salon never hurts. Very cool all around.

cpd

Add comment January 17th, 2010 Trackback Bookmark on del.icio.us

Ari Melber on Organizing For America: The Birth of the “Permanent Field Campaign”

Looking for something substantive to read over the three-day weekend? Check out Ari Melber’s new analysis of Organizing For America, the successor to the Obama campaign’s grassroots list, published over at tPrez and produced in association with Personal Democracy Forum. Ari’s done a terrific job of interviewing stakeholders involved in the evolution of the Obama organizing machine, including OFA members themselves and Congressional staff who’ve been targets of their activism.

In particular, Ari highlights the distinct differences between this “permanent field campaign” and the traditional activities of political parties between elections. I’m only partway through digesting the report, but this section of the conclusion nails the long-run implications:

(more…)

1 comment January 15th, 2010 Trackback Bookmark on del.icio.us

Next Posts Previous Posts


Bookmark and Share

Follow Epolitics.com

Follow Epolitics.com on Twitter    Follow Epolitics.com on Facebook     Follow Epolitics.com on Twitter

Email updates (enter address)


SEARCH EPOLITICS.COM


Epolitics.com EBooks

NEW!

Download Winning in 2012 Ebook Download Learning from Obama

Recent Highlights

Epolitics.com Classics

Calendar

January 2010
S M T W T F S
« Dec   Feb »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Most Recent Posts

Calendar

January 2010
S M T W T F S
« Dec   Feb »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Posts by Month

home about contact colin delany put e.politics to work