Archive for July 31st, 2006

Reporter Using Google Ad to Find Source on Katherine Harris’s Staff

Wow, I can’t say I’ve ever heard of this one before — a reporter for the St. Petersburg Times is looking for an internal campaign source by running a Google ad tied to searches for the name “Katherine Harris” (i.e., the former Florida elections official, current congressmember and senatorial candidate). We must presume that she thinks that Harris’s campaign staff members are so disgruntled that she can catch one of them through an online ad. Ouch, that one’s gotta hurt! Thanks to Salon for the initial hit.

cpd

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Effective Press Releases in a Search-Driven World

PR guy David Meerman Scott has an excellent (and free) publication on his site about using press releases to reach customers (and by extension, potential campaign supporters) directly. Some quick points:

  • A release sent out through a newswire (PR Newswire, US Newswire, etc) spreads throughout the online world and is reprinted and republished extensively.
  • A release whose title and content are written with web searchers in mind has a big advantage and can help steer readers/potential supporters interested in your subject to your site, where you can capture them. Too many press releases are filled with jargon, gobbledy-gook and vapor.

I write about this subject in the e.politics section on spreading the word about your site or campaign, but he goes into much more detail. Well worth reading! (Thanks to the Miami Herald for sending me to it in the first place.)

cpd

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Quick Hits — July 31, 2006

  • Les Blogs Herald France’s Newest Inalienable Right — The French are crazy about blogs, spending more time on them than Americans, British or Germans. Money quote — “You cannot be elected president of France without a blog.”
  • MySpace Blurs Line Between Friends And Flacks — Advertisers are taking advantage of MySpace to create ads that don’t look like ads. Promotional tactics include profiles for fake people who love a product and for movie characters.
  • The Politics of Science — A pro-stem-cell-research group called the Campaign to Defend the Constitution is spending $250,000 for ads in the New York Times print version and $100,000 for online ads, though the article doesn’t specify where the online ads will run. (BTW, nice campaign name, guys. Next up: “Campaign for Butterflies, Puppies and Nice Warm Hugs”)

cpd

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